Family, The Lord’s Prayer, & Discipleship

“Being from a very progressive university, an ethics professor, in the Divinity School, you can imagine I get questioned about my faith a lot on campus. People used to ask me what it meant to be a Christian and I would launch off into some long rant about discipleship and the Cross and being dead to the world and alive to Christ, and participating a faithful church that embodied God’s love and will to the world. People looked at me like I was crazy. They would just be confused. Now, when people ask me what it means to be a Christian, I just say ‘Christians are those people that pray the Lord’s Prayer.'”

– Stanley Hauerwas

It has been an intense week for my mind. I have been taken to task, twice, for my pacifism. I see this as a good thing. But dealing with the theological questions, the pastoral concerns, and assumptions that under gird both, has been mentally and emotionally taxing. I also have been have a bit of an internal struggle with our Wednesday night series, as I am a part of the planning team. On top of this, I have the added stress of thinking through some long term discipleship questions for our little “Resident Aliens” group at Southwest. Beyond that, I have two major projects on the horizon: Putting together a baptism class for parents of pre-teens, and rethinking our ministry to our neighbors at Country Garden Apartments. Take a deep breath, because I am not done. I have just submitted my application to the Holy Angels Convent for admission to be an Oblate there. I begin that journey next weekend at a Contemplative Prayer retreat. There is also still some bite-back from Revolution Episode 2: Songs of Peace and Justice. Moreover, I am beginning to plan the next one (Revolution Episode 3: How to Love a Lover), and re-thinking our approach to marketing, venue, audience, engagement, etc.

And every day, I go home to my wife and newborn son. And it’s okay. Not gone, but okay. And then I pray the Lord’s prayer. And I it all somehow becomes a part of my discipleship.

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